Sleep Alone
Bat For Lashes

Sleep Alone — Bat For Lashes

The dream of love is a two-hearted dream

thewolfkitten:

Poster for Kodoku no Gurume (The Solitary Gourmet).

thewolfkitten:

Poster for Kodoku no Gurume (The Solitary Gourmet).

Hanafuda (Japanese card game) in the film Kawaita Hana (Pale Flower, 1964) is beautifully captured by Masao Kosugi

Who knew gambling could exude such elegance?

Kawaita Hana (Pale Flower, 1964, directed by Masahiro Shinoda) follows an icy protagonist who blankets himself with the darkness of his own shadow. The film maximizes the stark contrast of light and shadow. Despite lacking the witty dialogue that is renowned in most of its American counterparts, Pale Flower is a prime example of film noir.

A Colt Is My Passport (1967)  Takashi Nomura 

The perfect payback is done with a deadly mix of wits and guts.

The Hermitage

wtfarthistory:

I absolutely love painted views of museum collections and Luigi Premazzi’s watercolors of the State Hermitage in St. Petersburg are among my favorites.  Today I will be spending as many hours as possible casually strolling the galleries, keeping an eye out for examples of WTF Art History.  Stay tuned…

Luigi Premazzi, The Room of Ancient Sculpture, 1856, watercolor.  The State Hermitage, St. PetersburgLuigi Premazzi, The Room of Ancient Sculpture, 1856, watercolor.  The State Hermitage, St. Petersburg

Luigi Premazzi, The Cabinet of the Italian Schools, 1860, watercolor.  The State Hermitage, St. PetersburgLuigi Premazzi, The Cabinet of the Italian Schools, 1860, watercolor.  The State Hermitage, St. Petersburg

Luigi Premazzi, The Gallery of the French School, 1859, watercolor.  The State Hermitage, St. PetersburgLuigi Premazzi, The Gallery of the French School, 1859, watercolor.  The State Hermitage, St. Petersburg

Luigi Premazzi, The Gallery of the Flemish School, 1860, watercolor.  The State Hermitage, St. PetersburgLuigi Premazzi, The Gallery of the Flemish School, 1860, watercolor.  The State Hermitage, St. Petersburg

Luigi Premazzi, The Room of the Dutch and Flemish Schools, 1858, watercolor.  The State Hermitage, St. PetersburgLuigi Premazzi, The Room of the Dutch and Flemish Schools, 1858, watercolor.  The State Hermitage, St. Petersburg

How is this watercolor??

Hands Awkwardly Placed, by Bronzino

wtfarthistory:

image

Agnolo Bronzino, Portrait of a Sculptor, c. 1550, oil on canvas.  Musée du Louvre, Paris

This young man either looks like a solemn Michael Cera or Logan Lerman when he’s in The Perks of Being a Wallflower.

It’s a little bit more complex than that.

Simon Pegg’s reaction is priceless.

Oh, Brian. 

Smoking

miniaturefiction:

I lit the cigarette and took a few puffs. As I smoked it, I watched as it burnt down to nothing. It burned out just like my whole life.

I’m flabbergasted that no film noir that I’ve watched has a monologue like this.

Some of my favorite shots from Tokyo Drifter (1966) by Seijun Suzuki.

Welcome to Seijun Suzuki's Tokyo Drifter (1966), where the only thing that matters is style. Everything is staged to be a visual spectacle, whether it’s the fashion, the set, or cinematography.

In Tokyo Drifter, viewers are shocked by artificial-looking and minimalistic set, which was probably due to budget cuts (a restriction that Suzuki was familiar with). Whatever the reason may be, it adds a whimsical touch, a much needed twist to an average writing.

While I praise this film visually, I had a hard time following the story. A lot of times, I couldn’t help but to think that some connecting shots were missing. I like to propose a theory that a rabid dog stormed into the editing room and ran with a couple of film reels, property of Nikkatsu studio. All in all, the movie proves itself to be memorable even without the aid of a cohesive storyline.

mastersoflight:

Shadowland

"Down these mean streets a man must go, who is himself not mean, who is neither tarnished nor afraid"

-Raymond Chandler

Yes, I know this is a no-brainer, but the film noir aesthetic is a classic for a reason and it won’t be ignored! Noir is one of my favorite genres, as much for the visual elements as for the acting and dialogue. The first film in the pantheon is considered to be The Maltese Falcon (1941), with Orson Welles’ Touch of Evil closing out the cycle in 1958. In the 16 years between, the language of noir was refined to such a degree that the films tend to read as smaller episodes in one long story, and  the characters seem to inhabit a shared world.

It’s hard to think of many genres of American cinema, other than westerns, that achieve this level of continuity. It’s almost as though these different directors, screenwriters and studios had an unspoken agreement to tell this story of greed, revenge, double-crossing, deception, and those noble few who bravely fight against those forces in the shadowlands.

Of course, the lighting design is a HUGE component to creating this world. Favoring a combination of low keylights augmented by hot kickers and rims, and harsh undiffused keylight with murky cookie-created patterns in the background,  cinematographers and gaffers made a glorious chiaroscuro dreamworld, fit only for the depraved and forlorn. Light from the sun penetrates into their dumpy offices and rented rooms through the slats in venetian blinds, while lone figures are illuminated by streetlamps only, in silhouette. This aesthetic has influenced many famous directors (David Lynch, Martin Scorsese, etc.) and become a permanent fixture in our cinematic parlance.

Even with stories that are more or less the same between movies, with many of them involving passionate crimes, the allure of film noir has yet to be eroded by time. We are separated from their characters by decades apart, but many of us are still entranced by the world of film noir and the lives that were entangled in it.

labellefilleart:

Portrait of a Young Woman in a Hat Holding a Bouquet of Flowers, Albert Lynch

labellefilleart:

Portrait of a Young Woman in a Hat Holding a Bouquet of Flowers, Albert Lynch

laclefdescoeurs:

Peonies, Henri Fantin-Latour

laclefdescoeurs:

Peonies, Henri Fantin-Latour